Celebrities are the True Porn Stars

These days you’re likely to hear as much about porn as you are to see it. It’s still the same story – an industry bound by controversy, crippled by its inability to escape moral judgement and stigma. To this day, porn’s marginalisation to the murky edges of society is reflective of our surviving inability to deal with taboo discourses, and always the opportunity for progressive discussion is squandered by short-sightedness.

Man looks shocked at laptop

Celebrity Culture

And yet, the true culprits to a generation of sexualised teens are nothing to do with the sex industry. There are far more pernicious forces out there feeding into the lives of young people, about as discreet as a dildo in a 10-year-old’s lunchbox. This, of course, is our modern celebrity culture, which whilst masquerading under the guise of entertainment, glorifies and normalises uncontrolled sexually explicit behaviour.

Every single day the news headlines are plastered with yet another celebrity showing too much, or contorting their body into an endless list of provocative poses. The like of Miley Cyrus have increasingly blurred the lines between entertainment and porn. They garner attention from sexually explicit behaviour – whether it is a lewd photo shoot or ‘twerking’ on stage in front of millions. And the troubling thing is that it works. Savvy celebrities are constantly trying to push the increasingly tenuous line of social acceptability, using sex to launch themselves into the limelight. For them, launching a sex tape has become a legitimate way to enter into celebrity stardom, with figures such as Kim Kardashian showing just how lucrative staring into an ‘accidentally’ leaked porno can be.

But these forces are only insidious because of the lies they tell. The fiction of our celebrity culture is that it represents something better, more morally attainable, than that of the porn industry. We consistently draw arbitrary lines between those that sell their sexuality. For some it is received by a punitive hand, such as escorts, prostitutes and even in porn stars, whilst for others it is glamorised and glorified, fed on by the mainstream press like the last remaining morsels of public interest.

Is porn any better? Well, yes. It is honest about what it represents – it is a legitimate industry entered into by thousands every year. They do not pretend that it is anything more, and they are not the role models for millions of girls across the world. And these – the Kardashian horde et al. – are only the most obvious examples of pseudo-celebrities indirectly whoring themselves out for money, whilst avoiding the harsh stigmas bestowed elsewhere by society.

We can take these celebrities with a pinch of salt, and put down their behaviour to either a compulsive desire for attention or a desperate need to exercise some latent daddy issues. But then on the other side, there is Rita Ora. Featuring on England’s primetime television programs (The Voice) this popstar quickly abandoned the need to exercise her talents for fame and money. After her meteoric rise, she quickly realised the quickest path was not through achievement, but in providing sexually suggestive titbits to electrify the imaginations of men across the globe.

Condoning Questionable Behaviour

Earlier this year she realised a Twitter photograph of her getting ‘her first facial’, with a not-so-mysterious white substance trailed across her chin and lip. And yet here we are – almost condoning, and certainly exonerating, this sort of behaviour.

Fiction is a lie that tells a truth. So let’s simply dispose of the lie and agree that there is no difference between many modern day celebrities and porn stars, other than society’s compulsive need to judge different behaviours as better or worse. The sex industry is the lifeblood of the Western culture, it’s about time we have more honest and open discussions about it and stop pretending that selling sex is restricted to the niche of society.

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